ADI Part 3 - Core Competencies

ADI Part 3 - the Core Competencies

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The Keys to Success


"Remember on phase 1 to keep your instruction high . . . your 'learner' will need a full talk through to help them develop the skills they need"

Harry Elkan ADI Trainer

Be a driving doctor

Effective training can produce excellent results
The DSA Core Competencies are by far the most important skill to develop for Part 3 success . . . that's why our recovery courses place such a heavy emphasis on this area of training

In this section, we'll take a look at what the DSA refer to as the core competencies.

The core competencies are the most important element, or 'sub skill', that you need to develop to succeed in the part 3 test.

Read, practice and assess your skills in the core competencies constantly. This area of skill is vital.

Very many part 3 failures are due to the trainee not recognising driver errors, and failing to offer the corrective remedial action for the errors that they do see.

Driving is referred to by psychologists as a 'psychomotor skill'. What this means is that there is a 'thinking' part . . . the area of driving where we take in information and make decisions, and a physical part . . . the skills of using the controls with physical movements.

Clearly, in such a complex task as learning to drive, our learners will make mistakes. If they continue to make those same mistakes, they will form them into habits. Human beings are very, very good at forming habits. That's the way we learn to do almost anything. We learn the actions, think about it, then form the habits we need to help us carry out any task that we wish to do.

The problems arise where those habits are not correct or constructive. To miss a mirror check now and again makes the driving process easier for the learner, yet it could lead to dangerous practices if allowed to continue.

The longer a bad habit is allowed to continue, the stronger it becomes and the harder it becomes to eradicate. Many experienced instructors who take on a fairly advanced learner who's been allowed to continue with bad habits will testify to that.

The system we use to correct driving faults falls nicely into three areas. It is these very areas that the DSA refer to as the core competencies.

The three areas are fault identification, fault analysis, and remedial action.

Use your full range of Q and A skills to get to the root cause of the fault
Remember . . . it's no use just identifying the fault. You have to analyse and remedy it too

In a nutshell, we have to spot the faults to identify them. We then need to analyse them to discover why the fault was made, and we next decide on the action to take to rectify it and ensure that it doesn't happen again . . . the remedial action.

You can take a look at these three areas in greater detail by following the links, but first a brief example of the core competencies in action.

It's very common on a part 3 test to hear of the same problems occurring again and again. Imagine the scene, it's a typical phase 2 meet and cross with anticipation lesson. The SE is driving along a busy street with the worried trainee alongside . . .

The SE is driving too fast towards a meeting situation . . .

The trainee says "Now, check your mirror and slow down . . ."

A little further, and the same thing happens . . .

The trainee says "Now, check your mirror and slow down . . ."

A little further, and the same thing happens again. . .

The trainee says "Now, check your mirror and slow down . . ."

A little further, and the same thing happens . . . and again, and again . . .

quote symbolThe most vital skill is fault identification, because you can't fix a fault you don't see, but seeing the fault is just the start . . . you have to analyse and remedy the fault for success at Part 3. Fixing driver errors is your core task as an ADI . . quote symbol
Harry Elkan ADI Trainer

What's happening? The trainee is identifying the fault, but has he analysed it to find out why it's happening and then put remedial action in place to rectify it? No, not at all.

Think about it this way . . . if you went to the doctor because you were feeling unwell, how would you react if the doctor had a quick look at you and said "You have a pain in your tummy. NEXT"

You probably wouldn't be very happy. The doctor has identified the fault, but stopped there.

If the doctor said "You have a pain in your tummy. That's because you have a nasty stomach bug. NEXT"

Still not particularly helpful.

But if the doctor said "You have a pain in your tummy. That's because you have a nasty stomach bug. It's not a serious problem and we can sort it. I'm going to give you a pill to cure it. Just take one a day for a week. NEXT"

Now, you'd be much happier. The doctor identified your problem, analysed what it was and then gave the correct cure.

Do the same with your learners. Be a driving doctor.

Back to our phase 2 example. How much better to hear the following . . .

The SE is driving too fast towards a meeting situation . . .

The trainee says "Now, check your mirror and slow down . . ." Taking careful note, the trainee thinks to himself 'I'll watch for this. Could have been a one off, but we'll see . . .'

A little further, and the same thing happens . . .

The trainee says "Now, check your mirror and slow down . . ."

He then pulls the SE over, as he can't fully analyse this fault and offer the correct remedial action whilst driving into all sorts of other dangers on the road at 30mph

"Ok, you're doing very well. Your car control is very good, but I've noticed on a couple of occasions that we seem to be driving a little too quickly into these meeting situations . . . do you think that you could look a little further ahead and anticipate when we may need to slow down for yourself?"

SE "Yes, but I thought I was looking ahead"

Trainee "Yes you are, but perhaps if you look as far as you can see ahead of us, as well as the dangers near to us, you'll be able to anticipate when we are about to come into a meeting situation, check the mirror and slow down all by yourself"

SE "Aah. So if I look further ahead and think about what might happen I can be ready for it?"

Trainee "Yes, that's it exactly. We'll drive on now and get some more practice at this. You'll enjoy your driving much more and it will keep you safer on the road. Drive on when you're ready"

As a matter of interest, also note the use of positive language in the above. A very valuable tool in your armoury, and one explored in greater depth in other sections of the site.

Follow the links to look at these skills in more detail. Think about how you'll use the core competencies in all areas of your teaching. Think about some of the typical errors your trainer or learners make, and then see if you can apply the core competencies to put matters right.

 

 

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